Category: Conversation

How to apologize in English (expressing apology)

How to apologize in English pdf


To download and print this free English phrases list, click here.

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




APOLOGIZING
Apologies if…
Excuse me
Excuse me. Do you know what time it is?
How stupid / careless / thoughtless of me.
I am so sorry for…
I apologize for being late.
I apologize for…
I beg your pardon?
I beg your pardon.
I demand an apology.
I don’t want to impose on / upon your hospitality.
I don’t want to impose.
I don’t want to interrupt.
I don’t want to keep you waiting.
I don’t want to take up your time.
I don’t want to waste your time.
I made a stupid mistake…
I must apologize for…
I owe you an apology
I shouldn’t have…
I was only trying to…
I wouldn’t like to bother you.
I’d like to apologize for being late. / I must apologize for being late / Please accept my apologies for being late
I’m really sorry.
I’m so sorry for being late.
I’m sorry but I have no time to talk.
I’m very sorry for stepping on your foot.
I’d like to apologize for…
I’m ashamed of…
I’m genuinely sorry.
I’m so sorry !
I’m very / deeply / terribly / extremely sorry
If you will excuse me, …
It was all my fault.
It was not my intention to…
It’s my fault that…
My bad
No problem. / Not at all. / It’s OK. / No worries. / Don’t worry about it. / It’s quite all right.
Pardon (me)
Pardon me for this.
Please accept our (sincerest) apologies.
Please don’t be mad at me.
Please excuse my (ignorance)
Please forgive me for… (+ Verb-ing)
Please, accept my apologies for…
Please, forgive me for…
Sorry
Sorry I’m late.
Sorry to interrupt, but…
Sorry to keep you waiting.
Sorry, I didn’t mean to…
That’s the end of it. / Think nothing of it.
That’s my fault.
There is no excuse for …
ACCEPTING APOLOGIES
Apology accepted
Don’t mention it
Don’t worry about it
Forget about it
I forgive you
I understand.
It doesn’t matter
It’s all good
Never mind.
No harm done
No need to apologize.
No worries
That’s all right
That’s OK
You couldn’t help it

©Englishfornoobs.com

How to Start a Conversation in English pdf

How to Start a Conversation in English


To download and print this free English phrases list, click here.

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




HOW TO START A CONVERSATION
Are you a friend of Mrs Dawson?
Are you going out this evening?
Are you having a good time?
Are you still working for Samsung?
Beautiful day, isn’t it?
Can / Could / May I ask you a question?
Can we get down to business?
Can you spare me a few minutes, please?
Did you catch the news today?
Did you get here OK?
Do take a seat. / Do sit down.
Do you do any sport in your free time?
Do you feel like a drink?
Do you have any hobbies?
Do you know many people here?
Do you know what time is it please?
Do you mind me asking…?
Drinks on me.
Excuse-me, have you got a light?
Have we met before?
Have you been here before?
Have you read any good books recently?
Have you worked here long?
Hi, I’m …. .  I wanted to introduce myself.
Hi, I’m …. . What brings you here?
How are things? / How’s life?
How are you getting on?
How did you become a dentist?
How do you know her?
How old’s your baby?
How was the traffic this morning?
How was the weather in London when you left?
How’s business?
How’s business? [informal]
I almost didn’t recognize you!
I like your bag!
I love the coffee here. Have you tried it before?
I love your dress. Can I ask where you got it?
I really like your new hairstyle.
I’d like to talk to you.
Is everything OK?
Is this your first visit here?
Isn’t it a lovely day?
It looks like it’s going to snow.
It’s been a long time, hasn’t it? / Long time no see!
It’s good to see you again!
Looking forward to the weekend?
Lovely day today, isn’t it?
Lovely weather, isn’t it?
Nice day, isn’t it?
Nothing wrong, I hope?
Please come in. / Come in please.
Please take a seat
Pretty nice place, huh?
There’s something I want to tell you.
What advice can you give me?
What are you happy about?
What are you worried about?
What can I do for you?
What do you think about this transit strike?
What do you think of the food here?
What do you think of the new Iphone?
What does your name mean?
What have you been up to?
What time do you leave for work?
What TV shows do you like to watch?
What was the last concert you went to?
What will you have?
What would you like to drink?
What you been up to lately?
What’s happening? / What’s going on?
What’s your puppy’s name?
What’s the next trip you have planned?
What’s the strangest compliment you’ve ever gotten?
What’s the weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten?
What’s your favorite thing to do around here on the weekends?
Where did you study?
Where did you work before you started here?
Where’s the last place you traveled?
Will you join me?
Won’t you have a drink?
Would you care to join me?
Would you do something for me?
Would you like to go to the cinema tonight?
You look great today.
You look in great shape!

©Englishfornoobs.com

English conversation: Exchanging contact details

Exchanging contact details


To download and print this free English phrases list, click here.

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




EXCHANGING CONTACT DETAILS
Give me a call./ Give me a ring. / Ring me up.
I’m ex-directory. [UK] / I’m unlisted. [US]
I’Il email you all the details.
I’ll write it down for you.
Feel free to contact me. / Feel free to get in contact with me. / Feel free to get in touch with me.
Give me a buzz. [familier]
What’s the country code for Ireland?
Ring me on. . .
Here are my contact details. / Here is my address and phone number.
Would you like to exchange contact details / telephone numbers / email addresses?
Could you spell that out for me, please ? / Would you mind spelling that out for me, please?
You can get in touch with me at this number: . . .
You can reach me on. . .
You can reach me at. . .
Will you give me your phone number?
Would you write that down for me, please?

©Englishfornoobs.com

How to introduce yourself and someone else in English

How to introduce yourself and someone else in English


To download and print this free English phrases list, click here.

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




INTRODUCING YOURSELF AND SOMEONE ELSE
What’s your name?
Allow me to introduce Mr William. [formal]
Have you met before?
Haven’t we met before?
Hi Tina. I’m Paul.
Hi. i’m Paul.
I ’ve been sent by. . .
I don’t think we’ve met before. / I don’t believe we’ve  actually met yet.
I just wanted to introduce myself / May I introduce myself?
I’d like to introduce you to my friend.
I’d like to introduce you to Mr Jackson / There is someone here I’d like you to meet, this is Mr Jackson.
I’m originally from France, but I live in Spain.
May I introduce Sam to you?
My name is…
This is Mr Thomas. / Let me introduce Mr Thomas.
This is my boss, Mr Allen.
This is my friend, Tina.
We haven’t been introduced.
What is your name again ?
What part of the States do you come from?
Where are you from ? / Where do you come from?
Who sent you?
REQUEST PERSONAL INFORMATION
What’s your name? — My name is Kevin.
Can you give me your address, please?
Don’t forget your passport!
Here’s my ID (Identity Card).
How old are you ? — I’m 24 (years old).
I was born on May the 15th.
I’m Peter Smith.
So what do you do with yourself?
What do you do?
When is your birthday? When were you born?
Where are you from?
Where do you live?
Where do you work?

©Englishfornoobs.com

Greetings in english for beginners pdf

Greetings in english for beginners


To download and print this free English phrases list, click here.

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




GREETINGS IN ENGLISH
Hello
Good morning!
Good afternoon!
Hi
Good evening
Good night
How are you? How are you doing?
I’m fine, thank you. / I’m okay. Thanks. / Fine, and you?
How about you?
Nice to meet you.
Nice to meet you too.
Likewise
It’s good/nice to see you.
Nice/Good to see you again.
Pleased to meet you.
What brings you here?
How nice to see you!
What’s up?
Look who’s here!
So there you are!
WHEN IT’S TIME TO LEAVE
I’ve got to go.
Goodbye
I hope we’ll meet again.
It was good meeting you.
It was great seeing you again.
It was great to catch up!
Keep in touch!
Keep me posted!
See you again sometime.
See you in the morning
See you later
See you tomorrow
See you tonight

©Englishfornoobs.com

How to say the date in English

How to say the date in English

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.





Ask for the date in English:

Look at these examples:

  • What’s today’s date ? / What’s the date today ?
  • It’s May 5. / It’s the 5th of May.
  • What day is it today ? / What day is it ? / What’s today ?
  • Today’s Thursday, May 5th (May fifth). 

Be careful of the difference between ‘day’ and ‘date’.

  • Day: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday…
  • Date: July 14th, December 2nd, January 3rd…

Note: remember to capitalize the months! = January, not january

Why put “th”, “nd” or “rd” after the number?

These are ordinal numbers! Indeed, to say the date in English you should not use normal numbers but ordinal numbers:

Ex:  Today is the seventh of August (NOT:  Today is the seven of August  )

How to read ordinal numbers from 1 to 31:

Days of the Month
  1st    first
  2nd    second
  3rd    third
  4th    fourth
  5th    fifth
  6th    sixth
  7th    seventh
  8th    eighth
  9th    ninth
  10th    tenth
  11th    eleventh
  12th    twelfth
  13th    thirteenth
  14th    fourteenth
  15th    fifteenth
  16th    sixteenth
  17th    seventeenth
  18th    eighteenth
  19th    nineteenth
  20th    twentieth
  21st    twenty-first
  22nd    twenty-second
  23rd    twenty-third
  24th    twenty-fourth
  25th    twenty-fifth
  26th    twenty-sixth
  27th    twenty-seventh
  28th    twenty-eighth
  29th    twenty-ninth
  30th    thirtieth
  31st    thirty-first

_

How to read the date? A few examples:

1st May → the first of May
2nd April → the second of April
3rd December → the third of December
4th May → the fourth of May
5th March → the fifth of March
6th June → the sixth of June
7th October → the seventh of October
8th August → the eighth of August
9th May → the ninth May
10th July → the tenth of July
16th March → the sixteenth of March
23rd November → the twenty-third of November
26th May → the twenty-sixth of May
30th May → the thirtieth of May

May 1 → May the first
May 2 → May the second
May 23 → May the twenty-third
May 30 → May the thirthieth

Ordinals are also used to talk about centuries:

  • The 16th century 
  • The 12th century 
  • The 20th century 

How to say the date in British English and American English:

The English and Americans have a different way of saying the date. If in doubt, it is better to use the British way which seems the most obvious:

  • British (day/month/year) → the seventeeth of July
  • American (month/day/year) → July the seventeeth

The year:

It is not necessary to say the year if you are asked for a current date. On the other hand, if you are talking about a date in the past or the future, it is worth saying the year. Don’t forget to put a comma beforehand:

  • 15/04/2001 → The fifteenth of April two thousand and one (orally) / The fifteenth of April, 2001 (in writing).
  • When were you born ? → 1st May, 1983.
  • When did you arrive in New York ? → In 2011.
  • When is the next World Cup ? → In July of 2017.

Talk about the beginning, middle and end of the month:

Look at these examples:

  • at the beginning of August 
  • in mid-October 
  • at the end of May 
  • by the end of November 

_

©Englishfornoobs.com

English conversation: Talking about possibilities

English conversation: Talking about possibilities


To download and print this free English phrases list, click here.

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




TALKING ABOUT POSSIBILITIES
It may / might / could snow tomorrow.
I suppose it will snow tomorrow.
I won’t be surprised if it snows tomorrow.
In all probability, it will snow.
It’s probably going to snow tomorrow.
It’s quite likely it will snow.
Maybe it will snow tomorrow.
Perhaps it’s going to snow tomorrow.
Possibly, it’s going to snow tomorrow.
The odds are it will snow tomorrow.
There’s a chance it will snow.
There’s a fifty-fifty chance of snow.
There’s a good chance it will snow.

©Englishfornoobs.com