Tag: Conversation

Idioms and phrases in English with colors

Idioms and phrases in English with colors


To download and print this free English phrases list, click here.

Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




IDIOMS AND PHRASES MEANINGS
A blue-eyed boy A critical description of a boy or young man who is always chosen for special favours by someone in a position of superior authority.
A bolt from the blue When unexpected bad news is received
A golden handshake A significant amount of money that is paid to a retiring manager or administrator, or to a laid-off worker.
A golden opportunity An opportunity that may never come up again.
A grey area Something that is not clearly defined, and there is still a debate about whether it is “black or white” in one way or another.
A highly coloured report Refers to a report that is exaggerated or has a biased opinion.
A red flag A signal indicating that something is not working properly or is not working properly
A white lie A “small” lie or a “harmless” lie told in order to be polite and avoid hurting someone’s feelings, or doing something that is not seriously wrong.
A yellow streak Someone who has cowardice in his character
As white as a sheet When someone is in a state of great fear or anxiety
Beet red Also used to describe dark red, usually the colour of a face (beet derivative).
Black and blue Used to describe something that is seriously wounded
Black as a skillet Used to describe something very dirty, black with dirt.
Black as night In a very dark place, when it is difficult to see anything.
Black eye A bruise near the eye
Black market A term used to refer to places where goods are purchased and sold illegally for profit.
Black out This means either obscuring by turning off or obscuring the lights or losing consciousness.
Black sheep Used to describe a person who is the “weird person” in a group, and who does not integrate with others around her. It could also be used to talk about a person who is a shame or embarrassment to his or her group.
Black tie event/affair A formal event where male guests wear black bow ties with tuxedos or evening jackets.
Blackball someone Exclude or ostracize someone socially, reject them.
Blacklist someone Put someone’s name on a list if they break rules and prohibit them from participating again.
Blackmail someone Extorting or taking money from someone by using their secrets against them and threatening to reveal them to others.
Blood red Used to describe the dark red color of something
Blue blood Used to describe someone from a noble, aristocratic or rich family.
Blue collar Used to describe men used as workers or factory workers.
Blue in the face Try very hard to win someone’s agreement, but usually without success.
Blue pencil To censor something, or limit the information that is shared
Blue ribbon To be of superior quality or distinction, the best of a group
Born with a silver spoon in one’s mouth born into a rich family
Browned off Being bored or bored with someone or something
Catch someone red-handed Catching someone committing a crime or doing something wrong that they shouldn’t be doing.
Chase rainbows When someone tries to get or achieve something that is difficult or impossible
Dyed-in-the-wool Used to describe someone or something that is permanent (such as wool that is dyed a certain color).
Feel blue When a person seems or feels depressed or dissatisfied
Golden boy Term given to a young man idolized for great skill, usually in sport.
Grass is always greener on the other side Used to describe a distant place, and better than, where you are now, or the situation of another person who is very different from yours.
Green belt An area of fields and trees around a city
Green thumb/green finger Used to describe someone with a talent for gardening, with the ability to grow plants.
Green with envy Used to describe someone who is extremely jealous, full of envy
In someone’s black books To be in disgrace or disgrace with someone.
In the black Meaning successful or profitable
Local colour Allows to describe the traditional characteristics of a place that give it its own character.
Men/boys in blue Used to describe the police, because of the color of their uniforms.
Off colour When someone is not feeling at his best, is very sick or uncomfortable
Once in a blue moon Occur extremely rarely, or only once in a lifetime.
Out of the blue Appearing out of nowhere without any warning, occurring suddenly or randomly by surprise
Paint the town red To go out and have a good time at a party.
Pitch black Another term for somewhere that is very dark, and you are unable to see anything.
Pot calling the kettle black (shorten version: pot kettle black) It is used when the person who hypocritically criticizes or accuses someone else is as guilty as the person he or she is criticizing or accusing.
Put something down in black and white Write or have written something on paper for confirmation or proof.
Raise a white flag This indicates that we have accepted the defeat and surrendered to the other party.
Red herring An unimportant subject that misleads everyone and distracts attention from the main subject.
Red hot Something new and exciting, creating a lot of demand
Red in the face Become embarrassed
Red tape A term used to refer to bureaucratic delays, excessive formalities and attention to rules and regulations, which often result in injustice to the ordinary citizen.
Red-carpet treatment (Similar to the one above) To receive special or royal treatment, and to be received with a great and warm welcome.
Red-eye A trip that leaves late at night and arrives early in the morning.
Red-letter day A memorable day due to an important event
Roll out the red carpet Welcome a person with great respect and give them a warm and welcoming welcome.
Sail under false colours Pretend to be something you’re not
See someone’s true colours Understand a person’s real character, often for the first time.
See the colour of someone’s money To prove that someone has enough money for something
Talk a blue streak When someone talks a lot and very quickly
The silver screen A term for cinema
To be colourless Used to describe someone who lacks personality, and who is really boring
To be given something on a silver plate/platter When something is offered to someone with all my heart (in a metaphorical sense)
To be green Used to describe someone who is immature or inexperienced.
To be in the red To have an overdraft, be in debt to your bank or owe money to a financial institution
To be kept in the dark Keeping someone’s secret, protecting the truth
To be out of the red To be free from debt
To be shown the red card This stems from football terminology, and means being fired from your work.
To give/lend colour to To help make a story or explanation more credible and easier to believe, or to accompany something
To look through rose-coloured/tinted spectacles/glasses When someone sees things in a way that is too flattering or optimistic.
To paint in bright/dark colours Describe something flattering (bright) or unflattering (dark)
To see red Reacting with uncontrollable rage against someone or something
To see the red light Recognize the approaching danger. The red light is referred to as
To show one’s true colours Reveal your true nature
White as a ghost someone who is very pale because of pain, fear, shock or disease.
White collar A term used to refer to office workers who traditionally wear a white white-collar shirt.
White elephant A term used to describe unnecessary possession, something that is useless.
Whitewash something To conceal or conceal wrongdoing or wrongdoing
With flying colours Complete something with a lot of distinction and excellent results.
Yellow-bellied Someone who is considered a coward or extremely shy

 

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Useful english expressions: War and conflict

Useful english expressions: War and conflict


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Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




WAR AND CONFLICT
a loose cannon
a No man’s land
a score to settle
an uphill battle
Arrow in the quiver
At daggers drawn
At gunpoint
Axe to grind
Battle of nerves
Bite the bullet
Bring a knife to a gunfight
Bury the hatchet
Close ranks
Cross swords
Dodge the bullet
Don’t shoot the messenger
Double-edged sword
Drop a bombshell
fight fire with fire
fight tooth and nail
Hang fire / Hold fire
hold your ground
In your sights
Knight in shining armour
Lock and load
Long shot
Off like a shot
Off your guard
on the warpath
Open old wounds
Pull the trigger
Quick on the trigger
To get the final word
To have more than one string to their bow
To jump the gun
To make peace
To pull the trigger
To throw in the sponge
wash your dirty linen in public

 

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Common English phrases: Forgetting things

Common English phrases: Forgetting things


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FORGETTING THINGS
Can you refresh my memory?
I can’t remember off the top of my head
I have a vague recollection of…
I have no recollection of…
I lost my train of thought.
I simply forgot to do it.
I’ve completely forgotten.
I’m not sure i’m the best person to answer that
it completely slipped my mind.
it doesn’t ring a bell.
it went in one ear and out the other.
it will come to me in a minute
it’s on the tip of my tongue.
My mind went blank
Sorry, I forgot.
What was I thinking of?
(I’m afraid) I can’t remember.
(I’m afraid) it doesn’t ring a bell.
(Sorry) I have no memory of…

 

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Useful English sentences: Guessing things

Useful English sentences: Guessing things


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Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




GUESSING THINGS
About 6-ish
Around / about 10 o’clock
At a guess, I’d say she’s 24.
Chances are she’s 24.
I’d say she’s 23.
If I had to take a guess, I’d say he’s 25
Knowing (the Brazilians), he likes football.
Off the top of my head, I think she’s 29.
Probably about 26.
We’re talking maybe late twenties.

 

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How to write a cover letter in English

How to write a cover letter in English


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HOW TO WRITE A COVER LETTER
Dear Sir or Madam
I would like to apply for the position of…
Although I have no previous experience in…, I have had…
As indicated in your advertisement…
As you can see from my enclosed résumé, my experience and qualifications match this position’s requirements.
As you will see in the enclosed CV, I have a good experience in sales…
Currently I am working for… and my responsibilities include…
I look forward to hearing from you soon. / Yours faithfully,
I am an experienced user of…
I am available for an interview
I am aware of
I am particularly interested in this job, as…
I am sending my resume as an attachment.
I am writing in response to your advertisement posted on…
I am writing to you about your advertisement.
I am writing to you in reference to your advertisement.
I am writing to you to apply for the position of….
I believe it is time for me to move to another company / department … like yours
I believe my qualifications match your requirements
I believe my qualifications would match your requirements.
I have …years experience of working…
I have an excellent command of…
I have worked as a … (/in) ….
I wish to apply for the post of…which you advertised in…on… .
I would define myself as a …..
I’ll do my best to…
In addition to my responsibilities as…, I also developed…skills.
In my current position I have worked … developed… created …
My area of expertise is…
My strengths are…
Please find my résumé / CV attached / enclosed.
Should you be interested in my application…
Should you need further information.
To carry out an internship
To have a sense of responsibility
To speak fluent English
To Whom It May Concern …
Your advertisement in (source) for the position of ( job) sparked my interest.
Yours faithfully,
Kind/Best regards,

 

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English useful phrases: Talking about time and space

English useful phrases: Talking about time and space


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TALKING ABOUT TIME AND SPACE
He’s always on the move.
all over the place
all roads lead to Rome
He vanished into thin air.
He was pacing back and forth
in high places
It’s just a stone throw away.
It’s just on our doorstep.
it’s a small world
Rome was not built in a day
Scatered to the four winds.
the old world
The place was bursting at the seams.
There wasn’t a soul to be seen in the street.
there’s a time and place for everything
To be walking single file.
to come to the right place
To pull up stakes.
To sleep under the stars.
We came the long way around.
When in Rome, do as the Romans do

 

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How to talk about the future in English

How to talk about the future in English


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HOW TO TALK ABOUT THE FUTURE
It’s going to happen (quite / very) soon.
..will happen in our lifetimes
All right, I’ll get on it.
Any second / minute / day now,
Are you doing anything tomorrow?
As soon as I can.
Before long,
Busy tomorrow?
Economic recovery is just around the corner.
Eventually,…
Everything Tom predicted came true.
Go outside first thing in the morning when you wake up
Got any plans for tomorrow?
Have you got anything on tomorrow?
Have you got anything planned for tomorrow
How’s tomorrow looking?
I can’t predict what’ll happen.
I can’t wait until…
I’ll do it later.
I’ll do it right away.
I’ll do my best.
I’m (really / so) looking forward to..
I’m (really) dreading…
I’m counting the days till…
I’m saving up to…
I’m trying to put off… as long as I can
I’ve set my heart on…
In (just) a few minutes..
In (just) a moment / minute..
In the distant future, the sun will disappear.
In the near future…
It was bound to happen sooner or later.
Not long now.
One day, I’m going to have to…
Paul does a pretty good job of forecasting the weather.
Someday people will live on mars.
Sooner or later I’ll get round to…
Sooner or later.
The children are counting the days to Christmas.
The elections are just around the corner.
The first cuts in our budget are a sign of things to come.
This study foreshadows great changes in our system of education.
Time will tell.
Tina’s prediction proved true.
We’re planning to move in the near future.
What are you doing tomorrow?
What results do you anticipate?
What’s happening tomorrow?
What’s on the cards for tomorrow?
What’s your plan for tomorrow?

 

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How to describe a picture in English pdf

How to describe a picture in English


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Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




HOW TO DESCRIBE A PICTURE
At the top / At the bottom there is …
Behind / In front of … you can see …
Between … there is …
Both pictures depict ..
During the day, at night, in the evening, in the winter, after school …
From my point of view
He could be …ing
I (don’t) like the picture because …
I can see…
I don´t know the word for it, but…
I don´t know what it is called
I like / I don´t like the picture because….
I think (that)
In both pictures…
In my opinion,
In the foreground/background there is …
In the foreground/background you can see …
In the middle/centre there are …
It can/could/might be a scene of…
It dates from…
It is addressed to …. It aims at + BVing
It is obvious that the artist wants to criticise / express / show …
It makes me think of …
It might be a …
It might be a symbol of …
It represents
It seems as if …
It symbolises…
It was drawn / painted / taken / made by… (+ auteur)
It was published in 2014.
It was taken by/in …
It’s a black-and-white/coloured photo
It’s a kind / a sort of…
It’s an advertisement for…
It’s not very clear but, probably…
It’s used for…
It’s what you do when you…
Maybe / Perhaps…
Maybe it’s a…
On the left/right there are …
The atmosphere is relaxing/peaceful/depressing
The issue raised is …
The lady / The man seems to …
The photo was taken by…
The photo/picture shows a landscape
The picture is composed of two parts.
The problem illustrated here is …
The scene takes place in the street, at school….
There are two main characters
There is / there are…
This document is a painting, a map…
To conclude / as a conclusion….
What I mean…
What I´m trying to say…

 

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English useful phrases: Expressing Disappointment

English useful phrases: Expressing Disappointment


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Feel free to leave a comment if you find any errors or if you have any suggestions to make to improve this lesson.




EXPRESSING DISAPPOINTMENT
What a shame!
Are you disappointed with me?
But what good will it do?
Disappointment was written in his face.
Her disappointment was visible.
Her hopes were dashed
How disappointing!
I had high hopes for …
I had hoped that I’d be able to meet him.
I thought he could do better.
I was so looking forward to …
I wish that someone had let me know.
I’m disappointed in you, Paul.
I’m disappointed in your decision, but I respect it.
I’d very much hoped that I’d be able to meet him.
I’d very much hoped that I’d get selected this time.
I’m disappointed in him.
I’m sorry to hear that.
I’ve never been so disappointed in my life.
It was an absolute waste of money.
It wasn’t as good as I thought it would be.
It’s a great shame.
It’s a little bit disappointing, isn’t it!
It’s most unfortunate.
It’s very upsetting that this has happened.
Lady Gaga announced her retirement, much to the dismay of her fans.
Oh dear! I’ve spilt the milk.
Oh no, what a letdown!
Oh no, what a shame!
Oh well, never mind.
Oh, damn!
Oh, dear! What fools we were!
Oh, no!
Oh, no! Not again!
Oh, that’s a nuisance!
Paul, now utterly disheartened, abandoned his project altogether.
That stinks.
That’s so disappointing!
That’s too bad.
That’s a great pity.
That’s a pity.
The failure to get the job came as a blow.
Things always go wrong.
Tina’s disappointment was apparent.
Unfortunately, I couldn’t reach there in time.
What we had been led to expect was …
What’s the point of giving a party now?
When I think of it!
You look so sad.

 

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English useful phrases Traveling by car

English useful phrases: Traveling by car


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TRAVELING BY CAR
This car is easy to handle.
Be careful, there is a no-entry sign.
Fasten your seat belt.
Follow this road.
Go straight on.
He was fined for speeding.
I have passed my driving test.
I have to fill up the tank.
Make a right turn at the stop sign.
Signal. / Indicate.
Start the engine.
Take the first Cardiff exit.
The traffic is clear.
Turn right / left.
CAR SHARING
Looking for a lift?
Roadtogether.com is a car share website.
Do you have a spare seat in your car?
Save money and petrol!
Why not share travel expenses?
AT THE GARAGE 
My car has broken down.
Check the tyres / the battery.
I have got a puncture.
Please check the oil level.
Please check the water level.
Please switch the engine off.
The battery is flat.
The car has run out of petrol / gas.
The engine won’t start.
USEFUL WORDS
Drive off
Get pulled over
Have a near miss
Pull over
Slam the brakes on
Slow down
Speed up
Step on it

 

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